Evicting Squatters In 72 Hours In Colorado – How To Get Rid Of Squatters Fast – New 2022 Law

How To Remove A Squatter From Your House In Colorado

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Squatting in Colorado is a hot topic and one that has been debated for a long time. Squatting has been around since the early 19th century, and has been a frequent struggle between those who own property and those who don‘t. Colorado has an interesting legal system when it comes to squatting, and this article will explore that system and explain the Colorado squatter’s rights.

What is Squatting?

Squatting is when someone lives on or occupies another persons property without the owners permission. This usually happens when someone moves onto a property and begins toset up camp without the owners knowledge. Squatting is often seen as a form of protest against property owners, but it can also be done out of financial necessity.

When someone is squatting, they may not have any legal rights to the property, but they may be able to establish “squatter’s rights through longterm occupancy.

Squatter’s Rights in Colorado

In Colorado, squatter’s rights are often referred to as adverse possession. Adverse possession is a legal principle that allows a nonowner of real estate to gain legal title to the property after occupying it for a certain period of time.

Who Can Claim Squatter’s Rights In Colorado?

In order to claim adverse possession in Colorado, the squatter must meet the following requirements:

1-The squatter must have uninterrupted possession of the property for at least 18 years.

2. The squatter must be in hostile possession of the property, meaning that they are occupying it without the owners permission.

3. The squatter must have actual possession of the property. This means that they must have actually been living on the property and not just visiting occasionally.

4. The squatters possession must have beenopen and notorious. This means that the squatters occupancy must be visible to the public, and not kept secret.

5. The squatter must have paid all taxes on the property during the 18year period.

6. The squatters possession must have been exclusive and continuous. This means that the squatter must have been the only person occupying the property during the 18year period, and must not have shared the property with anyone else.

7. The squatters possession must have been in good faith. This means that the squatter must have honestly believed that they had a right to occupy the property. If the squatter meets all of these requirements, they may be able to establish adverse possession in Colorado, and could potentially gain legal title to the property.

Adverse Possession Laws In Colorado

Adverse possession is a legal doctrine that allows a person to obtain title to land owned by another by continuously occupying it for a certain period of time. Adverse possession laws in Colorado are governed by Colorado Revised Statutes, Sections 3841101 to 3841203, and provide for an individual who satisfies certain requirements to obtain title to real estate.

The general rule of adverse possession in Colorado is that an individual must occupy, use, and/or possess land owned by another for a period of seven years in order to acquire title from the current owner. However, there are several other factors that must be met in order for the individual to successfully claim title under an adverse possession claim.

Open & Notorious Possession

Firstly, possession must be actual, open, notorious, hostile, exclusive, and continuous. Actual possession means that the individual must occupy the land and make it his or her own. The individual must occupy and use the land as if he or she were the actual owner. Open and notorious possession means that the use of the land must be visible to the public. The individual must use the land openly and without any attempt to conceal the use.

Hostile Possession

Hostile possession means that the individual must occupy the land without the consent of the current owner and without paying rent to the owner.

Exclusive Possession

Exclusive possession requires the individual to occupy the land as the sole user and occupier.

Continuous Possession

Lastly, continuous possession requires the individual to occupy the land for the entire sevenyear period without any gaps in the possession. In addition, the individual must also pay all applicable taxes on the land and make any necessary improvements to the land in order to successfully claim title under an adverse possession claim.

Adverse Possession Claim Priority

Additionally, the individual must be the first to file an adverse possession claim in the county where the land is located in order to establish priority over any other adverse possession claimants. Once all of the above requirements are met and the individual has occupied the land for seven years, the individual may then file an adverse possession claim in the county court in the county where the land is located.

Adverse Possession Claim Requirements

The individual must provide proof of all the requirements for an adverse possession claim listed above in order to establish his or her claim to the land. If the court finds that the individual has satisfied all of the requirements for an adverse possession claim, the court may then grant the individual title to the land. The individual will then be the legal owner of the land and will be able to transfer the title to the land.

Adverse possession is a complex legal doctrine and it is important for individuals to understand the requirements for an adverse possession claim in Colorado before attempting to claim title to land owned by another. In order to ensure that an individuals claim is successful, it is important to consult an experienced attorney to ensure that the individual meets all of the requirements for an adverse possession claim in Colorado.

The Color of Title Doctrine in Colorado

The color of title doctrine is a legal principle in the United States that establishes a claim to land if a title claimant has possessed, used, and controlled the land in a manner that is consistent with legal ownership. This principle was created to protect owners and users of land, providing a way to establish a valid title and claim to the land, even if a title has not been properly conveyed or established.

In Colorado, the color of title doctrine is governed by the Colorado statutes and case law. This article will outline the color of title doctrine in Colorado, discuss the requirements and exceptions of the doctrine, and provide examples of cases that have been decided in Colorado courts.

What is the Color of Title Doctrine?

The color of title doctrine is an equitable remedy developed to protect land owners, tenants, and other users of land from adverse possession claims and loss of property rights. The doctrine creates an exception to the statutory requirement for establishing a valid title. Under the doctrine, a person has a valid title even if the underlying title has not been properly conveyed or established. In essence, the doctrine allows a person to prove ownership of land based on the fact that they have possessed, used, and controlled the land in a manner consistent with legal ownership. The doctrine originated in England, where it was known asostensible title. In the United States, the doctrine is known as the “color of title and is recognized in most states. Color of title provides a remedy to a person who is claiming a legitimate title to the land, even though the underlying title was defective or incomplete.

Requirements of the Color of Title Doctrine in Colorado

In Colorado, the color of title is a matter of both statute and case law. The Colorado statutes outline the specific requirements for a claim of color of title. To establish a valid color of title claim in Colorado, a claimant must prove the following elements:

1. The claimant must have held possession of the land for a period of seven (7) years or more;

2. The claimant must have paid taxes on the land for a period of seven (7) years or more;

3. The claimant must have made improvements to the land;

4. The claimants possession must have been open, notorious and hostile;

5. The claimant must have held the land under a color of title; and

6. The claimant must have been acting in good faith. Exceptions to the Color of Title Doctrine in Colorado

There are several exceptions to the color of title doctrine in Colorado. The most common exceptions are:

1. If the land was acquired by fraud;

2. If the land was acquired through an illegal or immaterial title;

3. If the claimant was not acting in good faith; or

4. If the claimant is not the first party in possession.

Examples of Color of Title Cases in Colorado

In the Colorado case of Jones v. Miller, the court held that the plaintiff established a valid color of title claim. The plaintiff had been in possession of the land for more than seven years and had paid taxes on the land for more than seven years.

Additionally, the plaintiff had made improvements to the land and had acted in good faith. The court found that the plaintiffs claim was valid under the color of title doctrine and awarded the plaintiff the title to the land.

In the Colorado case of White v. Smith, the court held that the plaintiff did not establish a valid color of title claim. The court found that the plaintiffs alleged possession of the land was notopen, notorious, and hostile and that the plaintiff was not acting in good faith. The court also found that the plaintiff was not the first party in possession of the land. As a result, the court found that the plaintiff did not meet the requirements of the color of title doctrine and denied the plaintiffs claim.

The color of title doctrine is an equitable remedy that provides a way to establish a valid title to land, even if the underlying title has not been properly conveyed or established. In Colorado, the color of title doctrine is governed by the Colorado statutes and case law.

To establish a valid color of title claim in Colorado, a claimant must prove the following elements: possession of the land for a period of seven (7) years or more; paying taxes on the land for a period of seven (7) years or more; making improvements to the land; possession being open, notorious and hostile; holding the land under color of title, and acting in good faith.

There are several exceptions to the color of title doctrine in Colorado, including fraud, illegal or immaterial titles, lack of good faith, and not being the first party in possession. Colorado courts have addressed color of title claims in several cases, with varying results. Ultimately, the color of title doctrine is an important legal principle that serves to protect owners and users of the land.

Preventing Squatters In Colorado

If you own property in Colorado, it is important to be aware of the potential for squatting and take steps to protect yourself. In order to avoid squatters, it is important to secure your property by postingNo Trespassing signs and making it clear that the property is offlimits.

Additionally, it is important to visit your property regularly and check for any signs of squatting. If you do find evidence of squatting, it is important to take action quickly in order to prevent the squatter from gaining adverse possession.

Squatting is a common problem in Colorado, and it is important for property owners to understand the laws surrounding squatter’s rights. In order for a squatter to gain legal title to a property through adverse possession, they must meet all of the requirements outlined above. It is also important for property owners to take steps to secure their property and prevent squatting.

By understanding these laws and taking the proper steps to protect your property, you can prevent squatting and protect your rights as a property owner in Colorado.

Can You Evict A Squatter In Colorado?

True squatters can be removed within 72 hours, he said, compared with people who have to go through an eviction, which can take up to a month or more to complete. “It is a difficult process,” Goldstein, the lawyer, said.

Squatters in Colorado are an unfortunate part of life. Squatters are people who occupy a building or land without the owners permission or legal title. The Colorado statutes allow for owners to evict a squatter, but the process is lengthy and requires legal action. This article will give a brief overview of the eviction process for squatters in Colorado, as well as what to expect from the process.

The first step in evicting a squatter in Colorado is to serve a notice to vacate. The notice must be in writing and signed by the owner of the property. The notice must include the address of the property, the name of the squatter, and a date by which the squatter must vacate the property. The date must be at least seven days after the date the notice was served. The notice must also be delivered in person or in a manner that is likely to give actual notice, such as by mail or posting it on the property.

Filing The Complaint To Evict The Squatter

Once the notice to vacate has been served, the squatter must then vacate the property. If the squatter does not vacate by the date specified, the owner must then file a complaint in the local district court, asking the court to order the squatter to vacate the property. The complaint must include the address of the property, the name of the squatter, and a statement that the owner has served the squatter with a notice to vacate. Once the complaint has been filed, the court will issue an order for the squatter to appear before the court and answer the complaint.

The court will then conduct a hearing and make a decision on whether the squatter will be ordered to vacate the property. If the court finds in favor of the owner, the court will issue an eviction order, which must be served on the squatter. The eviction order must include the date by which the squatter must vacate the property, which must be at least five days after the date the order is served. Once the eviction order has been served, the squatter must vacate the property.

Last Ditch Efforts To Forcefully Evict Squatters

If the squatter does not vacate, the owner must then file a motion for an eviction hearing, which is a hearing held in front of a judge. At the hearing, the owner will present evidence that the squatter has not vacated the property. The judge will then make a decision on whether to issue an eviction order. If the judge orders the squatter to vacate, the order must be served on the squatter. The squatter must then vacate the property by the date specified in the eviction order. If the squatter still does not vacate the property, the owner must then file a motion for a writ of possession. The writ of possession is an order from the court granting the owner the right to evict the squatter.

Evicting Squatters After Serving A Writ Of Possession

The writ of possession must be served on the squatter before the eviction can take place. Once the writ of possession has been served, the sheriff will then schedule an eviction date. The eviction is usually done within a few days of the writ of possession is served. The sheriff will then remove the squatter and the owner can then retake possession of the property. Evicting a squatter in Colorado can be a lengthy and complicated process.

It is important to note that the process can vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction, so it is important to speak with a qualified attorney for advice and information about the specific process in your area. Additionally, squatters have certain legal rights and can contest the eviction at any time during the process, so it is important to understand all of the legal issues before attempting to evict a squatter.

Is Squatting Legal?

In the United States, squatting is illegal. The law states that an individual does not have the right to occupy someone elses property without their permission. In general, squatting is a civil offense and is punishable by eviction and/or fines. In cases where a property has been abandoned for a certain period of time, the owner may have forfeited their rights to the property, making it possible for squatters to take possession. In these cases, squatters may be able to assert their right of ownership throughadverse possession.

Is It Legal to Squat in a Home?

Adverse possession is a legal concept in which a person who occupies land or a building without permission can gain title to it after a certain period of time. The period of time required varies by state and is usually between five and 30 years. Is It Legal to Squat in a Home? In most cases, squatting in a home is illegal. The law states that an individual who enters someone elses property without their permission is trespassing and can be held liable for damages.

Is Squatting A Felony?

Squatting can also be considered burglary, which is a felony in most states. Even if a property has been abandoned for a certain period of time, the owner may still have rights to the property. Therefore, squatting in a home is not generally considered legal. However, some states do recognize the right of adverse possession. In these cases, squatters may be able to take possession of a home after a certain period of time.

If a squatter has maintained possession of a home for a period of time that meets the requirement of their states adverse possession laws, they may be able to take legal possession of the home.

How Long Can Squatters Stay In Colorado?

To make an adverse possession claim, squatters must remain continuously on a property for 18 years. However, if they’re paying property taxes and possess a color of title, squatters can make a claim after just 7 years.

How To Evict Trespassers In 72 Hours In Colorado (New Law In Effect For 2022)

I have some great news!

You can now evict a squatter who is trespassing in Colorado in 2022 in 72 hours flat!

Just follow the simple instructions below, fill out the forms, and take them to your local courthouse to get your day in court and evict your squatters promptly!

How To Evict A Squatter In 72 Hours If They Are Trespassing

  1. Follow Form JDF 153 – Instructions For Removal Of Unauthorized Person(s)
  2. Fill Out Your Proper PDF Forms Listed In The Instructions For Removal Of Unauthorized Persons Document

squatter steps for eviction colorado pdf

Step 3 – Fill Out Forms JDF 148 – 152 And An Affidavit Of Service

And for those of you who just read through all of that and said to yourself “I’m not doing all of that, isn’t there a faster, easier option” the answer is definitely a resounding yes!

You can choose to sell the house as-is with the squatter inside to a professional cash home buyer like us here at HBR Colorado.

Fill out the form below to get started!

Sell Your House Now - Please Submit Your Property Info Below

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What Are Colorado Squatters Rights In 2022?

This article will help define what rights squatters have in the state of Colorado.  If you are looking to learn about squatting rights in Colorado then this article will help you learn exactly what rights squatters have and how you can evict squatters from your property if they are staying there without permission.

Colorado Squatting Laws are very complicated, but the main thing that you need to know is that if a squatter has trespassed on your property by breaking and entering and does not have a lease, you can evict them but must give them 90 days to clear the premises; unless you follow the quick-eviction guide at the top of the page which allows you to evict them quickly within 72 hours.

Can Someone Evict A Squatter From A Property That They Are Purchasing?

If you are the one who is buying the property you can get an Attestation of non-lease signed by the owner and then file the court summons and complaint yourself to get the squatter evicted by the Sherriff swiftly in just 72 hours.

Do Squatters Need Color of Title to Make an Adverse Possession Claim In Colorado? 

You are bound to encounter the term “Color of Title” when looking up what rights squatters have in the state of CO.  Squatters will often cite this law as entitling them to some sort of rights to the property if they have lived there for a certain period of time.

With it, a squatter will need to have lived in the home for only 7 consecutive years before being able to file an adverse possession claim. 

Squatting Vs. Trespassing – How To Differentiate

Squatting Laws in Colorado are designed to protect tenants who are being wrongfully evicted, but they usually end up protecting squatters who are illegally trespassing on someone’s property, unfortunately. 

The problem is, if you don’t have direct evidence that they have broken into your home without permission then you have to evict them through the steps listed above.

squatter eviction meme funny

It is not legal to shut off someone’s utilities in the State of Colorado

Shutting off the utilities of anyone staying inside of a home is a crime and that is what’s known as an unlawful eviction and should not be done under any circumstances!

Unless, of course, you are willing to take on the legal risk of getting a criminal charge against you, in which case you will be the one who needs to show up in court to answer for charges, not the squatter!

Holdover Tenants in Colorado: Understanding Your Rights and Responsibilities

The concept of a holdover tenant in Colorado is one that many property owners and renters are unfamiliar with. Most residential rental agreements in the state are for a specific period of time, typically on a month-to-month basis. The agreement states the length of tenancy and the amount of rent to be paid. In some cases, however, the tenant may wish to stay on after the expiration of the agreement. This is where the concept of a holdover tenant comes into play.

A holdover tenant is an individual who remains in possession of a property after the expiration of their lease or rental agreement. This can be due to a variety of reasons, such as the tenant not being able to secure a new residence, or the tenant simply wanting to stay longer than the initial agreement. In Colorado, a holdover tenant is considered to be a tenant at sufferance, meaning they are occupying the property without the landlords consent or approval.

The laws governing holdover tenants in Colorado are complicated and nuanced. It is important to understand your rights and obligations as a landlord in order to protect yourself and your property. First, it is important to understand the definition of a holdover tenant in the state of Colorado. A holdover tenant is an individual who remains in possession of a property after the expiration of their lease or rental agreement. It is important to note that a landlord has no legal obligation to allow a holdover tenant to stay in the property.

The tenant is considered to be occupying the property without the landlords consent or approval. The laws governing holdover tenants in Colorado are different depending on the type of tenancy. For example, a monthtomonth tenancy is governed by the Colorado Revised Statutes (CRS). CRS 3812501 states that if a tenant remains in possession of the property after the expiration of their monthtomonth agreement, they are considered to be a holdover tenant. The landlord may then sue the tenant for possession of the property.

It is important to note that a landlord is not obligated to accept a holdover tenant. In fact, if a landlord does choose to accept a holdover tenant, the landlord must provide the tenant with a new written agreement, stating the terms and conditions of occupancy. This agreement must be signed and dated by both parties. The rights of a holdover tenant in Colorado are similar to those of a standard tenant. The tenant has the right to reasonable notice before being evicted. The landlord must provide the tenant with at least three days notice before they can begin the eviction process.

The landlord must also provide the tenant with written notice of the reasons why they are being evicted. The tenant also has the right to a hearing to contest the eviction if they feel the eviction is not justified. The landlord also has the right to seek damages from the tenant in the form of back rent and/or damages to the property. The landlord can also pursue legal action against the tenant for any unpaid rent or damage to the property.

The responsibilities of a holdover tenant in Colorado are also similar to those of a standard tenant. The tenant is responsible for paying any rent or other fees for the period of time in which they are in possession of the property. The tenant is also responsible for keeping the property in good condition and following all of the rules and regulations outlined in the lease or rental agreement. If a landlord decides to evict a holdover tenant, the process can be complicated and timeconsuming.

The landlord is not permitted to take matters into their own hands and forcibly remove the tenant, as this is considered illegal. The landlord must file a complaint in court and seek a court order. In order to do this, the landlord must first provide the tenant with written notice of the eviction, as well as the reasons for the eviction.

The landlord must then wait a certain period of time before the eviction process can proceed. In summary, understanding the concept of a holdover tenant in Colorado is essential for landlords and tenants alike. It is important to understand both the rights and responsibilities of a holdover tenant and landlord in order to protect both parties. When in doubt, landlords should consult a lawyer or other legal professional for guidance.

Proper laws landlords must adhere to when legally evicting a tenant

  • Landlords must follow the right process when evicting a tenant.
  • If not followed, the tenant can file a lawsuit with the county court or the district court.
  • If the tenant wins:
    • The County Court can award the tenant money (damages).
    • A District Court can stop unlawful eviction while the case is pending (injunction).

breaking and entering meme

What Is The Difference Between Squatting and Trespassing?

If a person is living in a home without expressed consent from the owner of the property, then their status of “squatter” and “trespasser” hinges on how they obtained access to the property in the first place.

If the person used force to gain entry to the home, then they are considered a “trespasser”, and if they gained entry by other means then they are considered a “squatter”.

Trespassing is a crime, and calling your local sheriff’s office is probably your best bet when dealing with this particular situation.  If the local law enforcement team deems the person is trespassing, then they will be removed or arrested immediately on the premises.

(The number one thing that you must not do is to leave the property unoccupied for an extended period of time, as this will attract squatters and trespassers alike)

You may also be interested in our other article detailing how to sell a rental property in Colorado.

bad tenants meme funny

What Rights Do Squatters Have?

Evicting Squatters Colorado…

If you have a squatter who is staying at your property without consent:

  • 2018 Updated SB 15 Law – Senate Bill 15 passed, which will aid homeowners in evicting squatters. Property owners must still file a complaint with the county court, but SB 15 only gives squatters two days to appear in court to present their case instead of months. If the unlawful occupants fail to appear in court, then the sheriff can be given the power to remove them from the property within the next 24 hours.
  • Colorado requires that you provide the squatter with at least a 3-day written notice, and once you have given them notice you may file an unlawful detainer to evict them through a standard court order.
  • If the individual refuses to vacate the premises within 48 hours, you may file the unlawful detainer with your local court office.  At this stage in the process, you may want to seek legal counsel to ensure that you are operating within the boundaries and guidelines of your state and local laws.  You can usually download an unlawful detainer form from the court website, then all you have to do is fill it out and file it at your local office.
  • Ensure that you are serving your squatters/trespassers with the required paperwork such as proof of service, and any other relevant documents that pertain to their current living situation.
  • Your local court will schedule a hearing that all parties must show up to, and you can present your case, and they will make a ruling based on the evidence provided to the courts.
  • Once the squatter has been served and has been given the chance to tell their side of the story, a hearing will be conducted which usually doesn’t take longer than 1 hour.
  • After the judge makes his ruling, you can then pass that along to the local sheriff, who will post a 5-day written notice to the squatter, and if they don’t leave within that time frame the local police will forcibly remove them and change the locks on the property.

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Alternative, Slower Method For Legally Evicting A Squatter In Colorado

Once you file the lawsuit, the case is held, and you win the lawsuit, you can now take that paperwork downtown and recruit the local sheriff to formally evict the squatter.

If you are still confused please read the official INSTRUCTIONS FOR FORCIBLE ENTRY AND DETAINER (FED)/EVICTION

Please keep in mind there is also a $97 filing fee

Some Things To Think About…

You may also run into scams when dealing with squatters in Colorado, so stay aware of your current surroundings and how people may be poised to take advantage of your property.  

Some dishonest people may attempt to rent out your property to another tenant, and the person renting the property will have no idea who the actual owner is.  

Other scams include squatters asking for large cash deposits in order to vacate the premises.  They will also often lie and say that they are renting the property from someone else, when in fact they are simply living for free without paying any rent.

Oftentimes, if sellers are living out of state and have inherited the property that the squatters are living in then they aren’t available to file the forms and formally evict the trespassers.

I just want these unauthorized people out of my house but the process is so overwhelming!

make a move gif

Can You Sell Your House With Squatters Still Inside?

Yes!

Our local home-buying company HBR Colorado has successfully evicted plenty of squatters all across the state of Colorado and we know the law inside and out, so we can confidently have them evicted fast!

If you are dealing with squatters and are wondering if you can sell the house for quick cash while they are still inside?  The answer is yes.

Please contact us by filling out the form below to get a free quote on your house in under 24 hours and sell your house fast right out from under those pesky squatters and you will never have to hear from them or deal with them again!

What If I’m Living Out Of State?  Can I Still Sell My House With Squatters In There?

Of course.  Selling your Colorado house while living out of state is no problem because we can perform the close 100% virtually as outlined below.

Once we send the paperwork and contracts to you through email and they are signed and sent over to the title company, the closing agent will work with you to get your wiring instructions for the transaction.

Once you have signed the paperwork and sent the title company your wiring instructions, the next step is for us to wire in the funds so that the closing agent can close the deal and get your cash wired directly into your bank account through a domestic wire transfer.

This is known as a “mail-out closing”.

The only caveat is that the forms must be notarized so you will have to drive to a local notary in your area to sign the closing documents.

notary public real estate closing stock photo

Are There Any Other Options Available To Quickly Get Rid Of Squatters?

Evicting squatters in Colorado can be an extremely challenging, time-consuming process that costs you a lot of money.  HBR Colorado is here to help you throughout the entire process, and we are able to make you an all-cash offer on your property and help you with evicting these squatters that have no right to be there in the first place.

We are willing to offer alternative solutions to sellers who are willing to “partner with us” on the deal.

For example, if you want to come to some type of agreement that we will evict the squatters and spend our money to fix up the home and then resell it, our company will be entitled to a percentage of the proceeds from the sale.

This is only for our more trusted clients, so we would prefer to get to know you a little bit more first before we consider doing something like this with you.  

But we are definitely open to it and that option is available for select clients.

Selling Your House For Quick Cash With The Squatters Still Inside

 Selling your Colorado house As-Is for Cash is the best way to clear the stress of dealing with squatters because then you will no longer have to worry about the property, as we will take over the deed and continue the eviction proceedings under our supervision.

If you want help selling your home fast for cash, and want a free online quote for your property today then please fill out the form below.

Fill out the quick form below to get an offer on your house TODAY!

Sell Your House Now - Please Submit Your Property Info Below

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4 responses to “Evicting Squatters In 72 Hours In Colorado – How To Get Rid Of Squatters Fast – New 2022 Law

  1. WOW,
    I’ve heard of Vultures but here is a critter that scavenges the already scavenged carcass, that is, preys upon the already weakened victims. Oh wait never mind, they are actually lawyers providing a valuable service 🙂 WHAT A WORLD.

    1. Thank You for the comment!

      We’ve actually helped evict squatters and have provided legal information free of charge and will continue to do so.

      1. can you revise this information now that sb 15 has passed. it shortened the time it takes to do all this to around 2-3 days. start to finish.

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